Current Term's Courses

​​​GCAC Winter 2018 Schedule: ​​Course and Workshop Schedule.pdf

​​​​Note: If you need to know the location of a course in which you are registered, please ​check your registration confirmation email. That email is sent to the address that is listed in your official U of T profile.

​January course registration will open on Wednesday, January 3 at 10:00 a.m.
Students may take a maximum of two GCAC courses in the January session.​

registration instructions & attendance policies​


January​ ​​2018 Course Schedule​​

​COURSE​DAY AND TIME​​DURATION
​​​   ​​ ​​Discipline -Specific Courses ​​​
​​​*Introduction to Science Journalism3 weeks  ​Section 1  ​Sat. 9:30 - 12:30   ​Jan. 20 - Feb. 3    ​
​​​​​*Oral Presentation Skills for Professional Master's Students​ 6 weeks Section 1Tues. 5:00 - 7:00Jan. 9 - Feb. 13
*Prewriting Strategies for Developing and Organizing Your Ideas (all divisions)​4 weeks  ​ ​Section 1 Wed. 10:00 - 12:00​    
Jan. 17 – Feb. 7  ​
*Understanding the Research Article: Reading Towards Writing (for students engaged in experimental research)​ 5 weeks  S​e​cti​on 1Thurs. 10:00 – 12:00Jan. 18 – Feb. 15
​​​​    ​Courses for ​Native Speakers of English ​
Becoming a Better Editor of Your Own Work (Humanities and Social Sciences)​
   4 weeks   Sec​tion 1Tues. 10:00 – 12:00 
Jan. 16 – Feb. 6 

*Oral Presentation Skills (for native speakers of English)
​​ ​​
6 weeks​Section 1Tues. 2:00 – 4:00 
Jan. 9 – Feb. 13    ​
6 weeks​Section 2Thurs. 10:00 – 12:00​​Jan. 11 – Feb. 15   
Courses for Non-​Native Speakers ​​of English​​​​​​
​ ​
Academic Conversation Skills​ ​​​​ ​
​6 weeks​​S​ection 1Mon. 4:00 – 6:00 
Jan. 8 – Feb. 12 
6 weeks​Section 2Fri. 1:00 – 3:00 
Jan. 12 – Feb. 16 
Academic Writing 1: Focus on Essentials​ ​​ ​​ ​​5 weeksSection ​1Thurs. 1:00 – 3:00 
Jan. 11 – Feb. 8 
Academic Writing 2: Focus on Grammar​ ​​5 weeksSection 1​Tues. 10:00 – 12:00 
Jan. 9 – Feb. 6
Academic Writing 3: Focus on Style​5 weeks​​Section 1Wed. 2:00 – 4:00 
Jan. 10 – Feb. 7 

*Oral Presentation Sk​ills (for non-native speakers of English)​ ​​ ​
​​ ​​ ​
6 week​s​​​​Section 1Tues. 10:00 – 12:00 
Jan. 9 – Feb. 13 
6 weeks​Section 2Wed. 6:00 – 8:00 
Jan. 10 – Feb. 14 
​Courses for IVGS (​Non-Native Speakers of English) (for students who are visiting but not completing a degree at the U of T)
​Academic Conversation Skills for IVGS 6 week​s​​​​ Section 1Fri. 10:00 – 12:00​​Jan. 12 – Feb. 16
​Academic Writing 2: Focus on Grammar for IVGS 5 week​s​​​​ Section 1Thurs. 6:00 – 8:00​​Jan. 18 – Feb. 15
​​Oral Presentation Skills for IVGS 5 week​s​​​​ Section 1Wed. 10:00 – 12:00​​Jan. 10 – Feb. 7
*Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate Studies Graduate Professional Skills (GPS) program.​​​​​​


​Course Descriptions​​​​

​​

​ACS - Academic Conversation Skills (for non-native speakers of English)

This course is for non-native speakers of English who wish to improve their listening and speaking skills in order to communicate more effectively in an academic environment. If you have difficulty participating in class discussion or speaking to your classmates and professors, this course is designed to meet your needs. Over six weeks, participants will gain confidence as they develop their ability to engage in academic dialogue. Through a series of class exercises that require active student participation, ACS focuses on topics such as how to present your ideas orally, how to disagree respectfully, and how to manage conversations sensitively.

Course duration: 6 weeks.

Section 1: Mondays, 4:00 – 6:00, January 8 - February 12 - Jade Kim

Section 2: Fridays, 1:00 – 3:00, January 12 - February 16 - Dr. Sara Osenton​

​If you have any questions about the Academic Conversations Skills c​ourse, please contact Dr. Jane Freeman: ​jane.freeman@​utoronto.ca.

ACS IV​GS - Academic Conversation Skills for IVGS (for non-native speakers of English)

This course is for non-native speakers of English who wish to improve their listening and speaking skills in order to communicate more effectively in an academic environment. If you have difficulty participating in class discussion or speaking to your classmates and professors, this course is designed to meet your needs. Over six weeks, participants will gain confidence as they develop their ability to engage in academic dialogue. Through a series of class exercises that require active student participation, ACS focuses on topics such as how to present your ideas orally, how to disagree respectfully, and how to manage conversations sensitively.

Note: Course registration is open only to those enrolled at the University of Toronto with the specific designation of International Visiting Graduate Student (IVGS).​ Course duration: 6 weeks.

Section 1: Fridays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 12 - February 16 - Dr. Jane Freeman

If you have any questions about the Academic Conversation Skills course, please contact Dr​. Jane Freeman: jane.freeman@utoronto.ca.

RETURN TO SEPTEMBER ​SCHEDULE​​

AW1 - Academic Writing 1: Focus on Essentials (for non-native speakers of English)

This class is designed for non-native speakers of English who wish to improve the overall quality of their academic writing. Students will learn to improve the formality of their writing; to make claims commensurate with their evidence; to create coherent paragraphs; to develop clear transitions; to enhance their academic vocabulary; to understand the correct use of verb tense in academic writing; and, overall, to see how academic writing in their new context may differ from writing they have done in the past. The goal of the course is to show graduate students some key strategies to improve their academic writing. This course is the first in our Academic Writing sequence; the second course—Academic Writing 2: Focus on Grammar—deals with grammatical issues and the third—Academic Writing 3: Focus on Style—tackles more sophisticated issues of style.

Course duration: 5 weeks.

Section 1: Thursdays, 1:00 – 3:00, January 11 - February 8 - Josef Addleman 

If you have any questions about which Academic Writing course is appropriate for you, please contact Dr. Peter Grav: peter.grav@utoronto.ca​ 


​​AW2 - Academic Writing 2: Focus on Grammar (for non-native speakers of English)

​This course is designed for non-native speakers of English who wish to improve the grammatical correctness of their academic writing and understand the way grammatical structures are used in academic writing at the graduate level. Students will learn to self-diagnose their most common grammatical errors, to apply the key grammatical rules learned throughout the course, to develop strategies to enhance grammatical correctness, and to identify resources for improving their grammar. Specific topic areas covered in the course include maintaining subject-verb agreement, minimizing article errors, using relative clauses correctly, avoiding punctuation errors, and clarifying incorrect or vague pronoun references.

Course duration: 5 weeks.

Section 1: Tuesdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 9 - February 6 - Dr. Paulie McDermid

If you have any questions about which Academic Writing course is appropriate for you, please contact Dr. Peter Grav: peter.grav@utoronto.ca 


​​AW2 IV​​​GS - Academic Writing 2: Focus on Grammar for IVGS (for non-native speakers of English)

​This course is designed for non-native speakers of English who wish to improve the grammatical correctness of their academic writing and understand the way grammatical structures are used in academic writing at the graduate level. Students will learn to self-diagnose their most common grammatical errors, to apply the key grammatical rules learned throughout the course, to develop strategies to enhance grammatical correctness, and to identify resources for improving their grammar. Specific topic areas covered in the course include maintaining subject-verb agreement, minimizing article errors, using relative clauses correctly, avoiding punctuation errors, and clarifying incorrect or vague pronoun references.

Note: Course registration is open only to those enrolled at the University of Toronto with the specific designation of International Visiting Graduate Student (IVGS).​ Course duration: 5 weeks.

Section 1: Thursdays, 6:00 – 8:00, January 18 - February 15 - Scott Jamieson

If you have any questions about which Academic Writing course is appropriate for you, please contact Dr. Peter Grav: peter.grav@utoronto.ca.

AW3 - Academic Writing 3: Focus on Style (for non-native speakers of English)

​The most advanced in our Academic Writing sequence, this course is designed for non-native speakers of English who wish to improve the style of their academic writing. The course helps students use their existing linguistic sensitivity to answer a number of key questions. How do the stylistic tendencies of English differ from those of other languages? How can writers accurately describe the work and ideas of other scholars without losing the clarity of their own voices? What strategies can writers use to produce smooth, readable texts that guide the reader from sentence to sentence, from paragraph to paragraph, and from chapter to chapter? Academic Writing 3: Focus on Style assumes that students already understand the essential attributes of academic writing at the graduate level and that they already have a solid command of English gramm​ar. It is therefore strongly recommended that students take this course only after they have completed Academic Writing 1 and 2.

Course duration: 5 weeks.

Section 1: Wednesdays, 2:00 – 4:00, January 10 - February 7 - Dr. Peter Grav

If you have any questions about which Academic Writing course is appropriate for you, please contact Dr. Peter Grav: peter.grav@utoronto.ca 


EDIT 1/2 - Becoming a Better Editor of Your Own Work (Divisions 1 and 2)

For native speakers of English in the Humanities and Social Sciences.

​Editing is a vital skill for graduate students. Most academic writers struggle to produce reader-worthy first drafts; becoming a better editor is what allows us to transform our early efforts into effective final drafts. Skill as an editor also helps us to revise our documents for different purposes. This four-week course is designed to introduce graduate students to a range of strategies for improving our own texts. We will look at strategies for correctness, clarity, concision, and coherence. Classes are practical and focused on issues that are commonly found in graduate student writing; students will also have an opportunity to meet with the instructor and receive feedback on their own work. Note: This section of the course is designed for graduate students working in the humanities and social sciences.

Course duration: 4 weeks.

Section 1: Tuesdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 16 - February 6 - Christy Guthrie

If you have any questions about the Becoming a Better Editor course, please contact Dr. Rachael Cayley: rachael.cayley@utoronto.ca.

ISJ -​ Introduction to Science Journalism

This course is designed for graduate students with an interest in the communication of science in the news media. Science journalists play a key role in the public understanding of science by reporting on the results and implications of scientific research. The guiding principles and basic techniques of science journalism will be explored through examples from print and broadcast media and through exercises in class. The focus will be on how science becomes news, where science journalists find their stories, how they conduct interviews and assemble information and then translate the complexities of current research into plain language for a mass audience. The course will consider the changing relationship between science and journalism in an online news environment driven by social media. Students will have the opportunity to receive feedback on their written work.

Course duration: 5​ weeks.

Section 1: Saturdays, 9:30 – 12:30, January 20 - February 3 - Ivan Semeniuk

Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate St​udies’ Graduate Professional Skills program.

If you have any questions about the Introduction to Science Journalism course, please contact ​Dr. Jane Freeman: ​jane.freeman@​utoronto.ca.

 

OPS (NS) - Oral Presentation Skills (for native speakers of English)

Does the thought of standing in front of an audience to present your work make you nervous? Would you like to present your ideas more clearly and more confidently? If the answer to these questions is yes, then this course is for you. In this course, you will receive guidance on various aspects of presenting, such as how to structure presentations, to design visual aids, to manage nerves, and to handle the question period. You will have a valuable opportunity to learn from the presentations of others and to practice what you learn in front of an informed and supportive audience of your peers. As a member of that audience, you will be able to practice active observing to further improve both your listening and presenting skills. Students will have the opportunity to receive a digital recording of their own presentation. Please note that this course will not address the specific linguistic needs of non-native speakers of English.

Course duration: 5 weeks with an optional tutorial in the sixth week.

Section 1: Tuesdays, 2:00 – 4:00, January 9 - February 13 - Ashley Williamson

Section 2: Thursdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 11 - February 15 - Dr. Trevor Cook

Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate Studies’ Graduate Professional Skills program.

​If you have any questions about the Oral Presentation Skills course, please contact Dr. Rachael Cayley​: ​rachael.cayley​@utoronto.ca​.​

​​

OPS (NNS) - Oral Presentation Skills (for non-native speakers of English)

Does the thought of standing in front of an audience to present your work make you nervous? Would you like to present your ideas more clearly and more confidently? If the answer to these questions is yes, then this course is for you. In this course, you will receive guidance on various aspects of presenting, such as how to structure presentations, to design visual aids, to mana​ge nerves, and to handle the question period. You will have a valuable opportunity to learn from the presentations of others and to practice what you learn in front of an informed and supportive audience of your peers. As a member of that audience, you will be able to practice active observing to further improve both your listening and presenting skills. Students will have the opportunity to receive a digital recording of their own presentation.

Course duration: 5 weeks with an optional tutorial in the sixth week​.​​

Section 1: Tuesdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 9 - February 13 - Matt Jones

Section 2: Wednesdays, 6:00 – 8:00, January 10 - February 14 - Josef Addleman

Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate Studies’ Graduate Professional Skills program.

​If you have any questions about the Oral Presentation Skills course, please contact Dr. Rachael Cayley​: ​rachael.cayley​@utoronto.ca​.​​ 

OPS (ProfMast) - Oral Presentation Skills for Professional Master's Students

This course is designed for professional Master’s students who want to be more effective speakers in their professional contexts. During the course we will consider the following topics: strategies for managing nerves, for handling difficult questions, and for designing effective slides, designing presentations for a range of audiences, decoding cultural assumptions in multicultural, multidisciplinary teams, and preparing for job interviews. Unlike ELWS’s other sections of Oral Presentation Skills, which focus largely on preparing lengthy research presentations for thesis defences and conference presentations, this section of the course will focus on short presentations of various types that will be chosen to reflect the professional contexts of the students in the course.​​

Course duration: 5 weeks with an optional tutorial in the sixth week​.

Section 1: Tuesdays, 5:00 – 7:00, January 9 - February 13 - Shakina Rajendram

Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate Studies’ Graduate Professional Skills program.

If you have any questions about the ​​Oral Presentation Ski​lls​ course, please contact Dr. Rachael Cayley: rachael.cayley@utorontoca.

OP​S IVGS - Oral Presentation Skills for IVGS (for non-native speakers of English)

Does the thought of standing in front of an audience to present your work make you nervous? Would you like to present your ideas more clearly and more confidently? If the answer to these questions is yes, then this course is for you. In this course, you will receive guidance on various aspects of presenting, such as how to structure presentations, to design visual aids, to mana​ge nerves, and to handle the question period. You will have a valuable opportunity to learn from the presentations of others and to practice what you learn in front of an informed and supportive audience of your peers. As a member of that audience, you will be able to practice active observing to further improve both your listening and presenting skills. Students will have the opportunity to receive a digital recording of their own presentation.

Note: Course registration is open only to those enrolled at the University of Toronto with the specific designation of International Visiting Graduate Student (IVGS).​ Course duration: 5 weeks.

Section 1: Wednesdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 10 - February 7 - Eleonora Maldina

​​If you have any questions about the Oral Presentation Skills course, please contact Dr. Rachael Cayley​: ​rachael.cayley​@utoronto.ca​.​​

PRE ​- Prewriting Strategies for Developing and Organizing Your Ideas (all divisions)

For students in all divisions.

This course is designed for graduate students who are conducting research towards a PhD or Master’s degree in all divisions. In order for a research paper to be clear to readers, it must first be crystal clear in the mind of its author. Whether you are writing a course paper, a journal article, or a thesis, this course will help you clarify in your own mind the content and structure of your argument before you begin to write. Participants will be introduced to a range of strategies for developing and organizing their ideas – strategies such as organizing notes through key words, outlining, diagramming, use of Aristotle's Topics, etc. – and will be encouraged to consider which strategies work best given their own learning styles. Drawing on techniques from classical rhetoric, the course will give students the chance to practice strategies for investigating and organizing ideas at both the pre-writing and mid-writing stages.

Course duration: 4 weeks.​

Section 1: Wednesdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 17 - February 7 - Dr. Jane Freeman

Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate Studies’ Graduate Professional Skills program.

If you have any questions about the Prewriting Strategies​ course, please contact Dr. Jane Freeman: jane.freeman@utoronto.c​a.

RA​ 3/4 - Understanding the Research Article: Reading towards Writing

For students engaged in experimental and population-based research​.

​What are the typical “moves” made in the Introduction section of a Research Article? Should you integrate your discussion with your results? How do you get readers to see the importance of your work? How much explaining should you do in your methodology section? These are typical questions for those involved in experimental research who wish to publish their findings. Graduate students spend a great deal of time reading research articles; however, when it comes to writing them, they often have difficulty following the example of what they have read. This course is designed to help graduate students engaged in experimental work write research articles by increasing their familiarity with the established forms of such articles. To do so, we will analyze the discourse strategies of articles that follow the basic pattern for reporting empirical research: Introduction, Methods, Results, and Discussion (IMRAD). The course will involve class discussion and close readings of articles drawn from representative fields of study. The course will also consider technical writing issues, such as what verb tense works for each section and strategic use of the passive or active voice. Students will also receive feedback on the research papers that they themselves are writing.

Course duration: 4 weeks with an optional tutorial in the fifth week.

Section 1: Thursdays, 10:00 – 12:00, January 18 - February 15 - Dr. Peter Grav

This course is suitable for students whose work involves experimental research, that is, students from the physical, life, or social sciences who need to write articles that more or less follow the IMRAD format. If you have any questions about whether this course is appropriate for you, please contact Dr. Peter Grav for clarification: peter.grav@utoronto.ca.

Subject to attendance and work submission requirements, this course may be used for credit in the School of Graduate Studies’ Graduate Professional Skills program.

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