Graduate Program Definitions

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November 2013 

This is an administrative document that provides definitions and operational descriptions for graduate academic programs and activities at the University of Toronto. The document was developed in line with the Province of Ontario's Quality Assurance Framework (QAF), 2010. The QAF definition is provided at the end of each section for reference. The process for new program proposals and proposals for new program components are outlined in part here following procedures outlined in the University of Toronto Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP)​.

The University of Toronto offers the following categories of graduate academic programs and activities:

1. Graduate Degree

The University of Toronto offers graduate degrees at the master's and doctoral levels upon the successful completion of the requirements of a specific approved graduate program.

QAF definition: "An academic credential awarded on successful completion of a prescribed set and sequence of requirements at a specified standard of performance consistent with the OCAV's Degree Level Expectations and the institution's own expression of those Expectations (see Appendix 1)."

1.1 Master's Degree

A master's degree is awarded upon successful completion of the requirements of an approved master's degree program. The requirements of the program must be consistent with the master's degree level expectations of the Ontario Council of Academic Vice-Presidents (OCAV).

The QAF does not provide a definition of master's degree.

1.2 Doctoral Degree

A doctoral degree is awarded upon successful completion of an approved doctoral degree program. The requirements of the program must be consistent with the doctoral degree level expectations of OCAV.

The QAF does not provide a definition of doctoral degree.

2. Degree Program

A degree program is composed of courses and/or other academic activities and must include research activities appropriate to the degree level expectations. Other academic activities may include a practical component such as an internship or other placement, and/or a major research paper or thesis. Together, these are known as the program requirements. The School of Graduate Studies academic Calendar outlines the specific requirements for each degree program offered by the University and is considered the contract between the University and the registered student. The SGS Calendar also provides general admission and degree program regulations relevant to all graduate students, including regulations on Good Academic Standing, Candidacy, Time Limits, etc., and, additionally those requirements appropriate to the student's program of registration. The points below highlight the defining characteristics of master's and doctoral degree programs, but are not intended to be comprehensive.

QAF definition: "The complete set and sequence of courses, combinations of courses and/or other units of study, research and practice prescribed by an institution for the fulfillment of the requirements of a particular degree."

2.1 Master's Degree Program

Master's degree programs provide education beyond the undergraduate level and appropriate to master's degree level expectations. They also have the following characteristics:

Advertising: The approved program name (with or without the approved fields/concentrations and/or emphases) is used for advertising purposes. In cases where a particular audience (specific cohort) is targeted for delivery of the program as a discrete offering, advertising may indicate the offering as part of the program, that is, "The Graduate Program in [approved degree program name] for [name the audience/cohort]".

Admission: An appropriate bachelor's degree that has appropriate breadth, depth and, where appropriate, an affinity to the graduate program to which the applicant is seeking admission as determined by the School of Graduate Studies; an average grade equivalent to at least mid-B or better, normally demonstrated by an average grade in the final year or over senior courses; at least two letters of reference; other qualifications as specified by a graduate unit.

Requirements: Master's programs have specific program requirements. Programs vary in length from a minimum of two sessions (terms) to two full academic years; a few master's programs are longer. A master's degree program is completed on a full‐time basis unless the specific program offers other approved options.

Program Completion: Students who successfully complete the requirements of the program receive the degree and may participate in a convocation ceremony.

Transcript: The transcript shows the complete academic record including course and other academic activity enrolments, and grades for each session of registration; the transcript also records the completion of any field/concentration associated with the degree program, program completion, and degree conferral.

Approvals: A master's degree program proposal follows the New Program Process under the University of Toronto's Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP), including an external appraisal. University governance approval is required at the level of the Division, as is approval of appropriate bodies of Governing Council. Quality Council approval is required, following University approvals. Finally, the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) approval is also required.

2.2 Doctoral Degree Program

Doctoral degree programs provide education beyond the undergraduate and master's levels and provide education appropriate to doctoral degree level expectations. They also have the following characteristics:

Advertising: The approved program name (with or without the approved fields/concentrations and/or emphases) is used for advertising purposes.

Admission: An appropriate master's degree or, in some programs, an appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university; an average grade equivalent to a B+ or better in a previous master's degree program (where relevant, demonstrated research competence equivalent to at least a B+ grade will be considered); Direct entry from a bachelor's degree to a PhD program may be available when permitted by the graduate unit (for direct‐entry applicants, an average grade equivalent to A‐ or better in courses in the relevant discipline is required); at least two letters of reference; other qualifications as specified by a graduate unit. In some programs, exceptional master's students may be approved for transfer into the second year of a five‐year PhD program before completing the master's degree program.

Requirements: Doctoral programs have specific program requirements. PhD programs are four years in length, except in the case of direct-entry programs which are five years in length, or flexible‐time PhD program options which may have a longer program length. Students who accepted into direct‐entry PhD programs are admitted into programs that are five years in length and, for those students, the PhD program includes about a year's worth of master's degree level program requirements in addition to the doctoral program requirements. The PhD program is completed on a full‐time basis unless the specific program offers an approved flexible-time option (for practising professionals). Other doctoral programs (e.g., SJD, EdD, DMA) have specific program lengths, also usually four years; some of these offer a part‐time option. All doctoral program requirements include a written thesis embodying original research that is successfully defended at a School of Graduate Studies Final Oral Examination (FOE).

Program Completion: Students who successfully complete the program receive the degree and may participate in a convocation ceremony.

Transcript: The transcript shows the complete academic record including course and other academic activity enrolments and grades for each session of registration; the transcript also records the completion of any field/concentration associated with the degree program, program completion, and degree conferral.

Approvals: A doctoral degree program proposal follows the New Program Process under the University of Toronto's Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP), including an external appraisal. University governance approval is required at the level of the Division, as is approval of appropriate bodies of Governing Council. Quality Council approval is required, following University approvals. Finally, the Ministry of Training, Colleges and Universities (MTCU) approval is also required.

3. Collaborative Program

A collaborative program is an intra‐university graduate program that provides an additional multidisciplinary experience for students enrolled in and completing the degree requirements for one of a number of approved degree programs. Collaborative programs are governed by a memorandum of agreement signed by the chair/director of the participating graduate units. Collaborative programs facilitate collaboration among the participating units through the membership of the Program Committee. In most collaborative programs, there is a supporting unit that may or may not enrol graduate students but contributes support or resources of some kind to the program. Commitments by a supporting unit are documented in the memorandum of agreement. Collaborative programs also have the following characteristics:

Advertising: The approved collaborative program name is used for advertising. Advertising must indicate that applicants must be admitted first to a participating graduate program and then to the collaborative program.

Admission: Admission to a collaborative program is predicated upon admission to a home degree program and requires the approval of the Collaborative Program Director and/or Program Committee. Registration in more than two collaborative programs at one time requires permission from the School of Graduate Studies.

Requirements: Collaborative programs include a common learning experience for students, usually met through the core course and/or a seminar series. The requirements of a collaborative program include some work that may be additional to that of the degree program; in many cases requirements are met through elective room in the home degree program. Each collaborative program has minimum requirements that normally include a core course. It is expected that a thesis requirement, if any, will be in the topic area of the collaborative program. Thesis supervision normally is provided to collaborative program students by core faculty in the collaborative program who are graduate faculty members from the student's home unit. Collaborative program requirements do not extend the degree program length. Students must meet both the degree program requirements and the collaborative program requirements.

Program Completion: The director of the collaborative program directly provides successful students who complete the collaborative program requirements, in addition to completing the degree program requirements, with a completion parchment signed by the collaborative program director and the SGS Dean and Vice‐Provost, Graduate Education. Students who successfully complete the collaborative program and the degree program receive the degree and may participate in a convocation ceremony.

Transcript: Students who complete the requirements of a collaborative program receive a notation on the graduate transcript, for example, "Completed Summer 2012—Collaborative Program in Neuroscience".

Approvals: A collaborative program proposal follows the Expedited New Program Process under the University of Toronto Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP). As such it does not require an external appraisal. It requires university governance approval of the Division and the Academic Policy and Programs Committee. Quality Council approval is also required and constitutes final approval. MTCU approval is not required for collaborative programs. Closure of a collaborative program follows a path similar to the approval path, except that the Quality Council is informed of the closure. Adding or deleting a participating program is a Minor Modification and requires University governance approval at the level of the division.

Adding a degree level (master's or doctoral) to an existing collaborative program is a Major Modification and requires University governance approval at the level of the Division. Major Modifications are reported to Academic Policy and Programs Committee for information. They are also reported to the Quality Council for information.

See also: Collaborative Programs Guidelines​

QAF Definition: "A collaborative program is an intra‐university graduate program that provides an additional multidisciplinary experience for students enrolled in and completing the degree requirements for one of a number of approved programs. Students meet the admission requirements of and register in the participating (or 'home') program but complete, in addition to the degree requirements of that program, the additional requirements specified by the collaborative program. The degree conferred is that of the home program, and the completion of the collaborative program is indicated by a transcript notation indicating the additional specialization that has been attained (e.g., 'MA in Political Science with specialization in American Studies'). Proposals for new collaborative programs will follow the Protocol for Expedited Approvals and thereafter will require cyclical review."

4. Combined Degree Program​

(The terms and conditions of accelerated undergraduategraduate programs within the category of combined program areunder discussion at the University.)

At the University of Toronto, a combined degree program allows a student to complete two degree programs at the same time within a reduced time period. This is facilitated by a limited number of identified program credits counting towards both programs. The combination involves two existing degree programs, at least one of which must be a graduate program. Where the combination includes an undergraduate program, that program is a second‐entry undergraduate program. In combinations that include an undergraduate degree only students who already have been awarded an appropriate undergraduate degree will be permitted to enrol in the combined degree program. There is an identified and limited overlap of program requirements in combined degree programs such that credits from one program may count towards the other and possibly vice versa; undergraduate credits may not count towards a graduate program. The overall time required to complete both programs is reduced in combination as a result of the overlap. 

Combined degree programs follow a prescribed path to completion involving a combination of full-time and part-time registrations in respective programs (students may not be enrolled full-time in two programs at the same time.) Students normally complete the programs at the same time and receive the degrees at the same time. Combined degree programs do not have directors but academic responsibility for the combined degree program is shared jointly by the unit chair/director responsible for each degree program; administrative and student matters are managed jointly by the program coordinators. Combined degree programs are governed by a memorandum of understanding that is signed by both the administrative unit chairs/directors and Faculties responsible for the degree programs. Combined degree programs have the following characteristics:

Advertising: The approved combined degree program name may be used consistently in advertising by each of the units offering the combination of degree programs.

Admission: Students must meet the admission requirements of both of the programs involved in the combination, and must apply and be accepted into each, as well as be accepted into the combined degree program. Each combined degree program defines the possible entry points for applicants and students.

Requirements: Students register and enrol separately in each program and must meet the requirements of both degree programs as specified for the combined degree program. Each combined degree program has a prescribed path to completion, structured so that both degrees are completed at the same time. Each combined program has an established time limit.

Programcompletion: Students who successfully complete the requirements of the combined degree program receive two degrees and may participate in a convocation ceremony.

Transcript: The graduate transcript shows enrolment in the combined degree program. Upon successful completion of both degree programs, the transcript shows completion of the graduate program/s in the combination, and the awarding of the graduate degree/s in the combination.

Approvals: A proposal for a combined degree program is a Major Modification and requires University governance approval at the level of the Division which is final approval. This is reported to the Academic Policy and Programs Committee for information. Major Modifications are also reported to the Quality Council for information. Program requirements for existing combined degree programs may not be altered unilaterally by either of the degree offering units and are subject to divisional governance approvals as appropriate for each program.

Combined degree programs are not defined in the QAF.

5. Diploma Program

A graduate diploma is awarded by the University of Toronto for completion of an approved graduate diploma program. Graduate diplomas are offered at the master's, post-master's, or doctoral level, and are composed of approved graduate courses or other graduate academic activities appropriate to the diploma level. In addition to aligning with the Quality Assurance Framework definitions, graduate diplomas also follow the University of Toronto's Policy on Diplomas and Certificates. The University of Toronto offers two types of graduate diploma programs:

QAF Type 2 Graduate Diploma Program

An approved Type 2 graduate diploma program is offered in conjunction with a master's or doctoral degree

program, the admission to which requires that the student be already admitted to the master's or doctoral program. The diploma program represents an additional, usually interdisciplinary or specialized, qualification. Type 2 diploma programs having the following characteristics:

Advertising: The diploma program is advertised in conjunction with the associated master's or doctoral degree program.

Admission: Students may be admitted to a Type 2 graduate diploma program once they are admitted to the associated master's or doctoral degree program.

Requirements: Students complete the requirements of the Type 2 graduate diploma program as well as the requirements of the master's or doctoral degree program. A Type 2 graduate diploma requires, as a minimum, the equivalent of one session of full‐time graduate studies, and, as a maximum, the equivalent of three sessions (one year) of full‐time graduate studies. The requirements for the diploma program normally will increase the overall program length of the two programs together.

Program Completion: Students receive the graduate diploma upon successful completion of both the diploma program and the degree program requirements. The diploma and the degree are presented to students at the same convocation ceremony.

Transcript: Once the student is accepted into the master's or doctoral program followed by acceptance into the diploma program, the transcript shows that the student is enrolled in both the master's or doctoral program and the diploma program. The transcript shows completion of the diploma program and the awarding of the diploma in addition to the usual recording of registration, completion, etc. in the degree program.

Approvals: A Type 2 graduate diploma program proposal follows the Expedited New Program Process under the University of Toronto's Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP). As such it does not require an external appraisal. University governance requires approval of the Division and Academic Policy and Programs Committee. Approval by the Quality Council is required. Finally, Type 2 diploma programs require MTCU approval.

QAF Definition: "Type 2: Offered in conjunction with a master's (or doctoral) degree, the admission to which requires that the candidate be already admitted to the master's (or doctoral) program. This represents an additional, usually interdisciplinary, qualification."

QAF Type 3 Graduate Diploma Program

An approved Type 3 graduate diploma program is a stand‐alone, direct admission program, generally developed by a graduate unit already offering a master's or doctoral degree program, and designed to meet particular needs. Type 3 diploma programs have the following characteristics:

Advertising: The approved diploma program name may be advertised independently of other graduate programs.

Admission: A Type 3 graduate diploma program has a minimum admission requirement of an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university. A Type 3 post-master's or doctoral-level diploma program normally has a minimum admission requirement of an appropriate master's degree.

Requirements: Students complete the requirements of the graduate diploma program. A Type 3 graduate diploma requires as a minimum the equivalent of one session of full-time graduate studies, and as a maximum the equivalent of three sessions (one year) of full-time graduate studies.

Program Completion: Students receive the graduate diploma upon successful completion of the diploma program. The diploma is presented to students at a convocation ceremony.

Transcript: Once the student is accepted into a Type 3 diploma program, the transcript shows that the student is enrolled in the graduate diploma program; upon graduation, the transcript shows that the student has been awarded the graduate diploma.

Approval: A Type 3 diploma program proposal follows the New Program Process under the University of Toronto's Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP), including an external appraisal. University governance requires approval at the level of the Division and appropriate bodies of Governing Council. Quality Council approval is required. Finally, MTCU approval is required.

QAF Definition: "Type 3: A stand-alone, direct-entry program, generally developed by a unit already offering a related master's (and sometimes doctoral) degree, and designed to meet the needs of a particular clientele or market."

6. Joint Degree Program

A graduate joint degree program is a program of study offered by two or more universities, or equivalent institution, in which successful completion of the requirements is confirmed by a single degree document. Joint programs are governed by a memorandum of agreement, signed by the appropriate individuals at each institution. Normally, a "lead" institution is identified in the memorandum of agreement for administrative purposes. Joint degree programs have the following characteristics:

Advertising: A graduate joint degree program may be advertised by each participating institution involved in offering the program.

Admission: Students apply to the joint degree program at one of the participating institutions and are accepted into the program at that institution (the "home" institution).

Requirements: Students admitted to the program through the University of Toronto complete the requirements of the joint degree program as articulated by the SGS Calendar. Students are governed by the policies and regulations of the University of Toronto as well as the regulations of the joint degree program. Some or all of the program offerings may be delivered at another participating institution or in an alternate educational setting and will often include graduate students who are enrolled in the joint degree program at other participating institutions.

Program Completion: Students enrolled at the University of Toronto who successfully complete the requirements for the program receive a U of T degree and may participate in a U of T convocation ceremony.

Transcript: The transcript for University of Toronto students indicates that the student is enrolled in the degree program. Upon successful completion of the joint program, the transcript shows that a U of T degree is awarded.

Approval: A joint graduate degree program proposal follows the New Program Process under the University of Toronto's Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP), including an external appraisal. A joint degree program proposal requires university governance approval at the level of the Division and appropriate bodies of Governing Council. It requires Quality Council approval. Finally, MTCU approval is required.

QAF Definition: "A program of study offered by two or more universities or by a university and a college or institute, including an Institute of Technology and Advanced Learning, in which successful completion of the requirements is confirmed by a single degree document."

7. Joint Educational Placement Agreement for Doctoral Students

The University of Toronto offers the Joint Educational Placement Agreement for doctoral students. Although "cotutelles" share some similarities of the Joint Educational Placement Agreement, the University does not offer traditional cotutelles. The Joint Placement is intended to allow exceptional doctoral students to pursue research opportunities and acquire research experience in two institutions at an early stage in their careers. Joint Educational Placement Agreements have the following characteristics:

Advertising: Joint Educational Placement Agreements are advertised in association with a doctoral program.

Admission: The Joint Educational Placement Agreement is a registration option for doctoral students who have applied and been accepted into an approved full time doctoral program at the University of Toronto. In addition, students must also be accepted into full time doctoral studies at a recognized collaborator institution. A Joint Placement student's application, enrolment and academic program must meet the doctoral requirements of both institutions.

Requirements: Students are enrolled in a doctoral program at each institution. The student must designate one institution as the lead institution and the second as the collaborator institution. This designation must be made at the time of the signing of the agreement and is binding for its duration. The academic and research program of a student enrolled in a Joint Placement should be based on ongoing or developing research collaboration between supervisors and/or research groups in the two participating institutions.

Program Completion: Students enrolled at the University of Toronto as the lead institution who successfully complete the requirements of the program receive a U of T degree and may participate in a U of T convocation ceremony.

Transcript: The University of Toronto transcript will show the student's registration in the U of T doctoral program, and a notation will be added upon successful completion of the program, for example, 'Awarded as a single degree under a Joint Placement arrangement with the (collaborator) institution'. 

Parchment: If successful, the student will be awarded a single doctoral degree from the lead institution with a parchment noting that the degree is 'Awarded as a single degree under a Joint Placement arrangement with the (collaborator) institution'.​​ 

Approvals: The University has endorsed the individual agreement model for establishing Joint Placements. Graduate units with applicants or students who are interested in a Joint Placement will develop an individual agreement in consultation with the School of Graduate Studies. Approval is secured with the appropriate signatures from the student and each institution in each case.

8. Conjoint Degree Program​

The University of Toronto and the Toronto School of Theology, according to a Memorandum of Agreement between the two institutions, have agreed to offer specific and approved conjoint programs, some of which may be graduate degree programs. The list of conjointly awarded degree programs is provided in the Memorandum of Agreement in a schedule; the list includes second‐entry undergraduate, and graduate degree programs.

Under the terms of the agreement, faculty appointments, admissions, grading, program requirements and all academic components of programs must be consistent with the appropriate standards of U of T. The School of Graduate Studies is represented on TST governance bodies. Graduate conjoint degree programs have the following characteristics:

Advertising: A conjoint graduate degree program is advertised by the University of Toronto or the Toronto School of Theology and its Member Institution as a graduate degree program that is conjointly offered by the University of Toronto and the Toronto School of Theology and its Member Institution.

Admission: Applicants must meet standards for admission that are consistent with the graduate admission standards of the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto according to master's or doctoral degree level.

Requirements: Students must meet requirements for conjoint graduate programs that are consistent with the rules, regulations and standards of the School of Graduate Studies at the University of Toronto according to master's or doctoral degree level requirements.

Degree Completion: Upon successful completion of a conjoint program, the student receives a conjoint degree which is conferred by both the University of Toronto and the appropriate Toronto School of Theology Member Institution. Students participate in a convocation ceremony offered by the Member Institution. The degree parchment includes signatures from U of T, the Member Institution, and the Toronto School of Theology.

Transcript: The Toronto School of Theology is responsible for maintaining and producing the transcripts of students in conjoint degree programs, including conjoint graduate programs.

Approvals: A graduate conjoint degree program proposal follows the New Program Process under the University of Toronto's Quality Assurance Process (UTQAP), including an external appraisal. It requires university governance approval at the level of the Division (TST and may include U of T division/s as appropriate) and appropriate bodies of Governing Council. It requires both Quality Council approval. Finally, MTCU approval is required.

QAF Definition: "A program of study, offered by a postsecondary institution that is affiliated, federated or collaborating with a university, which is approved by the university's Senate or equivalent body, and for which a single degree document signed by both institutions is awarded."

9. Field/Concentration, or Emphasis, Within a Program

A program may offer fields or concentrations, but not both. Emphases are offered independently of fields/concentrations.

9.1 Field/Concentration

The terms “field” and “concentration” are synonymous. A graduate unit may elect to identify either fields or concentrations but not both. Faculties may elect to identify fields or concentrations as the term of choice throughout the graduate units within the Faculty.

A field/concentration is an identified area of specialization or area of study in a graduate degree program that is related to distinct, demonstrable and collective strengths of the program’s faculty members. Fields/concentrations reflect the capacity of the research faculty to support graduate level research in specific areas.

In some fields/concentrations, a curricular pathway may be defined, requiring completion of a specific set of courses in a graduate degree program. There is no requirement to identify field/concentrations in either master’s or doctoral programs. Different degrees within a program may identify different field/concentrations.

As with all academic initiatives, proposals for fields/concentrations require demonstration of adequate resources. Field/concentrations are generally identified as areas of strength and are broadly associated with a discipline. The declaration of approved fields/concentrations in a program indicates that the program has the collective strength to offer these specializations. Approved fields/concentrations have the following characteristics:

Advertising: An approved field/concentration is advertised in conjunction with the degree program. A graduate program may advertise with or without reference to approved fields/concentrations.

Admission: Students are admitted into programs; in some programs students also may apply to and be admitted directly into an approved field/concentration. Students may be formally associated with a field/concentration in a program upon admission, if desirable.

Requirements: The total number of courses and other program requirements in an individual field/concentration normally are the same as the overall degree program requirements, and the same as in any other field/concentration in the program. 

Transcript: An approved field/concentration may appear as a notation on the student transcript upon completion of the degree program.

Approvals: A proposal for a field/concentration is a Major Modification and requires University governance approval at the level of the Division which is final approval. University approval of a new field/concentration is reported to the Academic Policy and Programs Committee for information. It is also reported to the Quality Council for information. Fields/concentrations may be closed following a similar approval path. Renaming of an existing field/concentration is a Minor Modification and the change is reported to the Quality Council for information.

9.2 Emphasis

An emphasis is associated with an identified set and sequence of graduate courses or other academic activity completed on an optional basis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for a graduate degree program. As with all academic initiatives, a proposal for an emphasis requires demonstration of adequate resources. An approved emphasis has the following characteristics:

Advertising: An approved emphasis is advertised in conjunction with the degree program.

Admission: Students are not admitted to an emphasis. Students are admitted to a graduate degree program and may complete the requirements for an emphasis as part of the requirements for the graduate degree program.

Requirements: The requirements for an emphasis do not affect the overall requirements for the graduate degree program and are not additional to the usual program requirements.

Letter of Completion: There is no transcript notation for completion of an emphasis. The graduate unit may issue a Letter of Completion to students who complete the requirements of an approved emphasis. This is provided upon completion of both the emphasis requirements and the degree program requirements.

Approvals: Proposal for an emphasis is a Minor Modification and requires University governance approval at the level of the Division. It is not reported to any higher level of governance or to the Quality Council. Closure or renaming of an emphasis is also a Minor Modification.

QAF Definition: A graduate emphasis is "An identified set and sequence of courses, and/or other units of study, research and practice within an area of disciplinary or interdisciplinary study, which is completed on an optional basis in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the awarding of a degree, and may be recorded on the graduate's academic record. While requiring recognition in the IQAP, proposals for their introduction or modification do not require reference to the Quality Council unless they are part of a New Program."

10. Graduate Professional Skills Program (Not for Academic Credit)

The Graduate Professional Skills Program (GPS) at the University of Toronto is a not‐for‐academic credit program presented by the School of Graduate Studies consisting of a variety of offerings that provide graduate students a range of opportunities for professional skills development. GPS recognises a need to help graduate students acquire skills in addition to those conventionally learned within their disciplinary program. Such skills include: communication and interpersonal skills, personal effectiveness, teaching competence and research related skills. GPS provides a framework for coordinating and publicizing existing and new offerings in the area of professional skills development for graduate students, for establishing and implementing appropriate criteria to ensure academic standards, and for creating an institutional "seal of approval" to enhance the value of these offerings to students.

Advertising: The GPS is an SGS‐sponsored program; information is available via the SGS website and graduate units.

Admission: There is no formal admissions process. Graduate students may self‐enrol via the U of T portal.

Requirements: GPS offerings consist of co‐curricular courses, workshops, seminars, and placements offered by various units throughout the University of Toronto. Students select from four skill areas and complete a total of 20 GPS credits.

Transcript: Students successfully completing the GPS will receive a notation on their transcript.

Approvals: The GPS program has overall approval from the SGS Graduate Education Council. GPS offerings are approved by the School of Graduate Studies.

References