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Graduate Speaker Series

July 9, 2020 @ 6:00 pm 7:00 pm UTC

Graduate Speaker Series is a bi-weekly series for UofT students featuring UofT graduate students from all academic backgrounds presenting their research and ideas to a general audience of graduate students. We invite all UofT graduate students to attend, engage with speakers, learn about academic disciplines other than their own and build new connections.

This week, we have two speakers!

Register here: https://us02web.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_eStLYY5ER_G8SFHj_6SYmg

Zihan Zhang
MASc Candidate, Dept. of MIE

Postponed Maintenance Scheduling Integrating State Variation and Environmental Impact

In asset management, defect signals are critical indicators of upcoming malfunctions, whose initialization and growth are often affected by uncertain environmental stresses. It is cost-effective to postpone the removals of defects, so as to take advantage of the remaining useful lifetime since the defect identification. However, the impact of environmental damage as well as heath state variation on postponement period is rarely addressed, which may lead to non-negligible malfunction hazard and maintenance resource waste. This study addresses these challenges by designing a state-based postponement maintenance policy. The environmental damage to asset lifetime is characterized by (a) random increment of state transition rates, and (b) probabilistic malfunction risk. Two levels of postponed maintenance windows are set according to inspection consequences. Level-1 window is pre-set along with a finite number of inspections, where a normally working asset over the inspection zone is left untouched until the window. Level-2 window is determined upon the defect identification, offering shorter postponed duration due to the vulnerability. The applicability is demonstrated by a numerical experiment on asset management of oil pipelines.

Liron Efrat (PhD Candidate, Department of Art History)

“Welcome to the Oasis of the Real: The Aesthetics of Convergence in Augmented Reality (AR)”

“All reality is mixed reality”, Mark Hansen declares in Bodies in Code (2006). Proclaiming that reality is formed via the mixing of bodies with technologies, Hansen explains that perceptual paradigms are configured by technologies’ applications. Adopting Hansen’s approach, I examine the lived-experience and our perception of reality in light of the most influential technological advancement in the past two decades: Augmented Reality (AR).

While AR is becoming a ubiquitous technology, it is crucial that we ask ourselves: How do we perceive our new, augmented reality and how does it influence our sense of being-in-the-world? In this talk, I will demonstrate how a reconceptualization of Augmented Reality as a Convergent Reality (CR) can help us better understand the cultural production and perceptual impact of AR and expose the politics of the medium.