Philosophy

Program Overview

The Department of Philosophy offers two degree programs, Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy.

Students may also be interested in the combined degree program in Law, Juris Doctor / Philosophy, Doctor of Philosophy (JD/PhD), which enables students to pursue work at the intersection of philosophy and law and to complete both the PhD and the JD programs in a shorter time than it would take to complete the degrees separately.

Applicants should consult the department’s website for complete details of graduate programs, course offerings, and short academic profiles of the graduate faculty.


Quick Facts

Domestic International
Application payment deadline MA, PhD:

4-Jan-2021

MA, PhD:

4-Jan-2021

Supporting documents deadline MA, PhD:

4-Jan-2021

MA, PhD:

4-Jan-2021

Minimum admission average MA:

mid-B in overall program and at least an A– in philosophy courses

PhD:

A–

 

MA:

mid-B in overall program and at least an A– in philosophy courses

PhD:

A–

 

Direct entry option from bachelor's to PhD? PhD:

Yes

PhD:

Yes

Is a supervisor identified before or after admission? PhD:

After

PhD:

After

If a supervisor is identified after admission (as per question above), is admission conditional upon securing a supervisor? PhD:

No

PhD:

No

Is a supervisor assigned by the graduate unit or secured by the applicant? PhD:

Applicant

PhD:

Applicant

Program length (full-time only) MA:

3 sessions

PhD:

4 years

5 years direct-entry

MA:

3 sessions

PhD:

4 years

5 years direct-entry


​Master of Arts

Program Description

The MA may be taken on a full-time or part-time basis.

Applicants should consult the department's web page for complete details on graduate programs, course offerings, short academic profiles of graduate faculty, and application procedures.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • ​Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Philosophy's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Admission requires an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university. Applicants must have a strong background in philosophy (roughly equivalent to an undergraduate major), with an average grade of at least a mid-B in the applicant's overall program and at least an A– in the applicant's philosophy courses.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with the following minimum scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL exam: 600 and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • Internet-based TOEFL exam: 100/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Equivalent results in some other recognized test of English-language proficiency are acceptable.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in philosophy as follows:

    • at least 1.0 FCE in the history of philosophy

    • at least 1.0 FCE in the problems of philosophy

    • 1.0 FCE designated courses only for MA students. One 0.5 FCE in the broad area of ethics/politics and the other 0.5 FCE in the broad area of metaphysics and epistemology. Either could be historical. The timing of the course requirement is:

      • 0.5 FCE taken in the first session

      • 0.5 FCE taken in the second session

    • PHL 3000H MA Professional Development Workshop (0.5 FCE).

  • Each MA student is assigned an advisor who will recommend a suitable program of philosophy courses. The student's choice of courses must be approved by the department.

  • It is possible for a full-time student to complete all requirements for the MA degree in the Fall and Winter sessions; however, the department encourages students to take no more than 3.0 FCEs during the Fall and Winter sessions and to complete the last course during the Summer session.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
5 years part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

 

Concentration: Philosophy of Science

This concentration will start in September 2021.

The Philosophy of Science concentration will provide students with a background in general philosophy of science and with specific topics in philosophy of science. Students will be prepared for academic work at the PhD level in philosophy and for non-academic career tracks that require strong critical thinking skills, as well as an understanding of science and its role in knowledge and society.

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Philosophy's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • Admission requires an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university. Applicants must have a strong interest in:

    • philosophy (evidenced in a strong writing sample, personal statement, and letters of reference) and

    • a strong academic background in either philosophy or, typically, a subject in the natural and social sciences, with minimum average grades of A–.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who graduated from a university where the language of instruction and examination was not English must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with the following minimum scores:

    • paper-based TOEFL exam: 600 and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE)

    • Internet-based TOEFL exam: 100/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Equivalent results in some other recognized test of English-language proficiency are acceptable.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must successfully complete 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • PHL XXXXH [course code to be determined] Advanced Introduction to Philosophy of Science (0.5 FCE)

    • 1.5 FCE in graduate seminars in philosophy of science or cognate areas of philosophy such as logic, philosophy of language, epistemology, metaphysics, or philosophy of mind

    • 1.0 FCE in the history of science from the following courses: HPS 2000H, HPS 2001H, HPS 2003H, HPS 2004H, HPS 2007H, HPS 2008H, HPS 2009H, HPS 4101H, HPS 4105H

    • PHL 3000H MA Professional Development Workshop (0.5 FCE).

  • Each MA student is assigned an advisor who will recommend a suitable program of philosophy courses. The student's choice of courses must be approved by the department.

  • It is possible for a full-time student to complete all requirements for the MA degree in the Fall and Winter sessions; however, the department encourages students to take no more than 3.0 FCEs during the Fall and Winter sessions and to complete the last course during the Summer session.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
5 years part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

Doctor of Philosophy

Program Description

The PhD program has two options: a five-year option and a four-year option. The five-year option is the most common and is the only direct-entry option for students with a bachelor's degree. The five-year option provides five years of funding and requires two years of coursework, while the four-year option provides four years of funding and requires one year of coursework. The program requirements are summarized below.

Students enrolled in graduate programs in philosophy in other universities are welcome to apply to spend a year studying at the University of Toronto. Please direct any inquiries to the Director of Graduate Studies.

Students who wish to take, for credit, one or more of the courses offered by the department as non-degree students, should apply for admission as Special Students. The application procedures and deadlines are the same as those for the MA program.

Applicants should consult the department's web page for complete details on graduate programs, course offerings, short academic profiles of graduate faculty, and application procedures.

 

PhD Program

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants approved by the department are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

  • Applicants should have a master's degree in philosophy from a recognized university with an average grade of at least an A– in the applicant's overall program. Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in philosophy at an advanced level.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who are not graduates of a university whose language of instruction is English must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with the following minimum scores:

    • Paper-based TOEFL exam: 600 and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE).

    • Internet-based TOEFL exam: 100/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Equivalent results in some other recognized test of English-language proficiency are acceptable.

Program Requirements

  • Course Requirements

    • Students must complete a minimum of 3.0 FCEs in philosophy, with a minimum A– average by the end of Year 1 including:

      • At least 1.0 FCE which must comprise history of philosophy courses.

      • At least 1.0 FCE which must comprise problems of philosophy courses.

      • The proseminar in philosophy (PHL 1111H) worth 0.5 FCE during the Fall session of Year 1.

      • With the department's permission, a student may replace up to 1.0 FCE in philosophy with graduate courses offered by another department, provided that the courses are required for the student's planned research.

  • Breadth Requirement. A student must demonstrate competence in at least six areas of philosophy, including the following:

    • Each of the following three areas in the problems of philosophy:

      • Contemporary issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of science.

      • Contemporary issues in values (ethics, politics, aesthetics, and philosophy of religion).

      • Contemporary issues in mind, language, and logic.

    • The remaining three required areas must be chosen from the periods in the history of philosophy specified below:

      • Ancient

      • Medieval

      • Seventeenth to eighteenth centuries

      • Nineteenth century

      • Twentieth century.

    • Competence in any area is normally established by successful completion of a graduate 0.5 FCE in that area.

    • A student must also demonstrate competence in logic (defined as proficiency in first-order symbolic logic with identity). This competence is expected of all students prior to beginning doctoral studies. Where this is not the case, competence must be acquired as a supplement to the required number of courses and be demonstrated to the satisfaction of the department by the time the qualifying requirement is met.

  • Revision Paper Requirement. To be satisfied either sometime during coursework or in the summer immediately following coursework. Students will designate a particular paper typically written during coursework as their revision paper and will solicit supervision on the revision of the paper from a faculty member. Students will receive verbal and written feedback on their paper from their faculty supervisor and will revise their paper in light of this feedback. A second round of feedback and revision may be sought by the student or the faculty supervisor, after which time the student will again revise and submit. Students should plan to complete the requirement over one or two months depending on whether one or two rounds of revision are undertaken.

  • Qualifying Requirement. After completing all course requirements, the student selects a thesis committee that will oversee his or her academic progress through the final thesis defence. The student meets with the committee to discuss a tentative thesis topic, construct an appropriate research reading list, and receive guidance on writing a qualifying paper. After submitting the qualifying paper and making any required adjustments to the reading list, the student takes a two-part (written and oral) qualifying examination based on the paper and the reading list. The paper will be submitted and written and oral exams taken four to six weeks later, during the Winter session of Year 2.

  • Dissertation Prospectus Requirement. To be satisfied at the September meeting of the student and their dissertation committee. The prospectus can take many forms and could, for example, proceed by indicating chapters, problems, and literature, and/or theses that will organize, be discussed, or be argued for in the dissertation. Committees will then give feedback on the overall plan. The length of the prospectus will vary from committee to committee but as a rough guideline, the prospectus may comprise a document of three to five pages.

  • Research Tools Requirement. Each PhD student must demonstrate competence in at least one research tool. A research tool may be one of the following:

    • Reading knowledge of a language other than English.

    • Familiarity with a discipline other than philosophy (e.g., linguistics, psychology, or mathematics).

    • Mastery of research methods not typical in philosophy (e.g., statistical methods).

    • The research tool will be determined by the Graduate Coordinator in consultation with the student's thesis committee.

  • Thesis. A candidate must submit a thesis on an approved subject and defend the thesis at a Doctoral Final Oral Examination. The department is not obligated to provide supervision in areas falling outside the competency, interest, or availability of its graduate faculty.

  • Residence. Students must be registered as full-time, on-campus students and must reside in sufficient geographical proximity to enable them to fulfil the course, breadth, qualifying, and language requirements set by the department in a smooth and timely fashion. They are also expected to participate fully in departmental activities. While writing the thesis, candidates are expected to be in residence, with the exception of absence for research.

  • Normal Timeline Through the Program. By the end of Year 1 of registration, students should have completed all the course requirements for the degree. By the end of the following year of registration, all students should have satisfied any remaining breadth requirements, selected a thesis committee, and passed the qualifying examination. (These are general deadlines; consult the department's web page for specific dates and further details.) Thereafter, the candidate selects a member of the thesis committee to be the thesis supervisor and begins work on the thesis, which he or she is expected to finish within two years.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years

 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants approved by the department are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies.

  • Applicants should have an appropriate bachelor's degree from a recognized university; a strong background in philosophy (roughly equivalent to an undergraduate major); and an average grade of at least a B+ in the overall program and at least an A– in philosophy courses.

  • Applicants whose primary language is not English and who are not graduates of a university whose language of instruction is English must complete the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) with the following minimum scores:

    • Paper-based TOEFL exam: 600 and 5 on the Test of Written English (TWE).

    • Internet-based TOEFL exam: 100/120 and 22/30 on the writing and speaking sections.

  • Equivalent results in some other recognized test of English-language proficiency are acceptable.

Program Requirements

  • Course Requirements

    • Students must take a minimum of 6.0 FCEs in philosophy, with an average grade of at least an A– including:

      • At least 2.0 FCEs which must comprise history of philosophy courses.

      • At least 2.0 FCEs which must comprise problems of philosophy courses.

      • The proseminar in philosophy (PHL 1111H) worth 0.5 FCE during the Fall session of Year 1.

      • With the department's permission, a student may replace up to 1.0 FCE in philosophy with graduate courses offered by another department, provided that the courses are required for the student's planned research.

    • To remain in good standing, students must complete 3.0 FCEs with an A– average by the end of Year 1, and 6.0 FCEs with an A– average by the end of Year 2.

  • Breadth Requirement. A student must demonstrate competence in at least six areas of philosophy, including the following:

    • Each of the following three areas in the problems of philosophy:

      • Contemporary issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and philosophy of science.

      • Contemporary issues in values (ethics, politics, aesthetics, and philosophy of religion).

      • Contemporary issues in mind, language, and logic.

    • The remaining three required areas must be chosen from the periods in the history of philosophy specified below:

      • Ancient

      • Medieval

      • Seventeenth to eighteenth centuries

      • Nineteenth century

      • Twentieth century.

    • Competence in any area is normally established by successful completion of a graduate 0.5 FCE in that area.

    • A student must also demonstrate competence in logic (defined as proficiency in first-order symbolic logic with identity). This competence is expected of all students prior to beginning doctoral studies. Where this is not the case, competence must be acquired as a supplement to the required number of courses and be demonstrated to the satisfaction of the department by the time the qualifying requirement is met.

  • Revision Paper Requirement. To be satisfied either sometime during coursework or in the summer immediately following coursework. Students will designate a particular paper typically written during coursework as their revision paper and will solicit supervision on the revision of the paper from a faculty member. Students will receive verbal and written feedback on their paper from their faculty supervisor and will revise their paper in light of this feedback. A second round of feedback and revision may be sought by the student or the faculty supervisor, after which time the student will again revise and submit. Students should plan to complete the requirement over one or two months depending on whether one or two rounds of revision are undertaken.

  • Qualifying Requirement. After completing all course requirements, the student selects a thesis committee that will oversee his or her academic progress through the final thesis defence. The student meets with the committee to discuss a tentative thesis topic, construct an appropriate research reading list, and receive guidance on writing a qualifying paper. After submitting the qualifying paper and making any required adjustments to the reading list, the student takes a two-part (written and oral) qualifying examination based on the paper and the reading list. The paper will be submitted and written and oral exams taken four to six weeks later, during the Winter session of Year 3.

  • Dissertation Prospectus Requirement. To be satisfied at the September meeting of the student and her dissertation committee. The prospectus can take many forms and could, for example, proceed by indicating chapters, problems, and literature, and/or theses that will organize, be discussed, or be argued for in the dissertation. Committees will then give feedback on the overall plan. The length of the prospectus will vary from committee to committee but as a rough guideline, the prospectus may comprise a document of three to five pages.

  • Research Tools Requirement. Each PhD student must demonstrate competence in at least one research tool. A research tool may be one of the following:

    • Reading knowledge of a language other than English.

    • Familiarity with a discipline other than philosophy (e.g., linguistics, psychology, or mathematics).

    • Mastery of research methods not typical in philosophy (e.g., statistical methods).

    • The research tool will be determined by the Graduate Coordinator in consultation with the student's thesis committee.

  • Thesis. A candidate must submit a thesis on an approved subject and defend the thesis at a Doctoral Final Oral Examination. The department is not obligated to provide supervision in areas falling outside the competency, interest, or availability of its graduate faculty.

  • Residence. Students must be registered as full-time, on-campus students and must reside in sufficient geographical proximity to enable them to fulfil the course, breadth, qualifying, and language requirements set by the department in a smooth and timely fashion. They are also expected to participate fully in departmental activities. While writing the thesis, candidates are expected to be in residence, with the exception of absence for research.

  • Normal Timeline Through the Program. By the end of Year 2 of registration, students should have completed all course requirements for the degree. By the end of the following year of registration, all students should have satisfied any remaining breadth requirements, selected a thesis committee, and passed the qualifying examination. (These are general deadlines; consult the department's web page for specific dates and further details.) Thereafter, the candidate selects a member of the thesis committee to be the thesis supervisor and begins work on the thesis, which he or she is expected to finish within two years.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Claudio Jaramillo

“I have learned that we all experience a similar journey, regardless our diverse backgrounds.”

Claudio Jaramillo
PhD, Language and Literacies
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