Slavic Languages and Literatures

Program Overview

The Graduate Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures offers instruction leading to two degrees—Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy—in one of the broadest ranges of Slavic languages and literatures available in a North American university.

Courses are offered in the following areas:

  • Croatian and Serbian Languages and Literatures
  • Czech and Slovak Languages and Literatures
  • Polish Language and Literature
  • Russian Language and Literature
  • Slavic Linguistics
  • Ukrainian Language and Literature.

Quick Facts

Domestic International
Supporting documents deadline MA, PhD:

13-Dec-2019

MA, PhD:

13-Jan-2020

MA, PhD:

13-Dec-2019

MA, PhD:

13-Jan-2020

Minimum admission average MA:

-B in final year of bachelor’s

PhD:

A- average in Master’s

MA:

-B in final year of bachelor’s

PhD:

A- average in Master’s

Direct entry option from bachelor's to PhD? PhD:

No

PhD:

No

Is a supervisor identified before or after admission? PhD:

After

PhD:

After

Is a supervisor assigned by the graduate unit or secured by the applicant? PhD:

Applicant

PhD:

Applicant

Program length (full-time only) MA:

2 sessions (1 year program)

4 sessions ( 2- year program)

PhD:

4 years

MA:

2 sessions (1 year program)

4 sessions ( 2- year program)

PhD:

4 years


Master of Arts

Program Description

All applicants complete the same application process. The department's admissions committee then determines each applicant's suitability for the one-year MA or two-year MA option, depending on their level of preparation. Students in the one-year MA program have the option to complete the program by coursework or coursework plus research paper.
 

MA Program (One-Year Coursework Option)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (preferably in a cognate area) with an overall standing equivalent to at least a University of Toronto mid-B in the final year.

  • A minimum A– average in all Slavic subjects taken in the final two years is recommended.

  • Proficiency in a Slavic language equivalent to at least three full years of language training, and broad familiarity with the literary and cultural history of the applicant's proposed disciplinary area(s) of interest (currently, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Russian, South Slavic, Slavic Linguistics, Ukrainian), as evidenced by undergraduate coursework at the 300 or 400 level, are required.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • SLA 1104H Introduction to Old Church Slavonic (0.5 FCE)

    • SLA 1040H Methods of Teaching Slavic Languages (0.5 FCE)

    • Students who provide evidence of satisfactory completion of equivalent courses to SLA 1104H and 1040H may be exempted from these courses.

    • Students who intend to complete the Slavic linguistics field must complete SLA 1109H Studies in Old Church Slavonic (0.5 FCE).

  • Language. Proficiency in the language of the major field of study must be demonstrated during first week of the first session in the program. Additional language courses at the undergraduate level may be required. These courses will not count toward the 4.0 FCEs required to complete the program. Successful completion of all coursework in the undergraduate language courses is part of a student's good progress in the MA program.

  • Residence. Normally, students spend a year in residence when they must be on campus and consequently in geographical proximity to be able to participate fully in the University activities associated with the program.

Program Length

2 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W)

Time Limit

3 years
 

MA Program (One-Year Coursework-Plus-Research-Paper Option)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (preferably in a cognate area) with an overall standing equivalent to at least a University of Toronto mid-B in the final year.

  • A minimum A– average in all Slavic subjects taken in the final two years is recommended.

  • Proficiency in a Slavic language equivalent to at least three full years of language training, and broad familiarity with the literary and cultural history of the applicant's proposed disciplinary area(s) of interest (currently, Czech and Slovak, Polish, Russian, South Slavic, Slavic Linguistics, Ukrainian), as evidenced by undergraduate coursework at the 300 or 400 level, are required.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students must complete 3.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • SLA 1104H Introduction to Old Church Slavonic (0.5 FCE)

    • SLA 1040H Methods of Teaching Slavic Languages (0.5 FCE).

    • Students who provide evidence of satisfactory completion of equivalent courses to SLA 1104H and 1040H may be exempted from these courses.

    • Students who intend to complete the Slavic linguistics field must complete SLA 1109H Studies in Old Church Slavonic (0.5 FCE).

  • Language. Proficiency in the language of the major field of study must be demonstrated during first week of the first session in the program. Additional language courses at the undergraduate level may be required. These courses will not count toward the 3.0 FCEs required to complete the program. Successful completion of all coursework in the undergraduate language courses is part of a student's good progress in the MA program.

  • Research paper written in English.

  • Residence. Normally, students spend a year in residence when they must be on campus and consequently in geographical proximity to be able to participate fully in the University activities associated with the program.

Program Length

2 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W)

Time Limit

3 years
 

MA Program (Two-Year Coursework Option)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree (preferably in a cognate area) with an overall standing equivalent to at least a University of Toronto mid-B in the final year.

  • A minimum A– average in all Slavic subjects taken in the final two years is recommended.

  • Intermediate proficiency in a Slavic language, as evidenced by two full years of language training or equivalent, is required.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework: Students must complete 7.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • SLA 1104H Introduction to Old Church Slavonic (0.5 FCE)

    • SLA 1040H Methods of Teaching Slavic Languages (0.5 FCE)

    • Students who provide evidence of satisfactory completion of equivalent courses to SLA 1104H and 1040H may be exempted from these courses.

    • Students who intend to complete the Slavic linguistics field must complete SLA 1109H Studies in Old Church Slavonic (0.5 FCE).

  • Language. Level of proficiency in the language of the major field of study must be established no later than the first week of the first session in the program to determine required language courses.

  • Residence. Normally, students spend two years in residence when they must be on campus and consequently in geographical proximity to be able to participate fully in the University activities associated with the program.

Program Length

4 sessions (typical registration sequence: F/W/F/W)

Time Limit

3 years

Doctor of Philosophy​

Program Description

PhD students may choose to complete a program in one of two fields:

  • Slavic linguistics

  • Slavic literatures

Field: Slavic Linguistics

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate University of Toronto master's degree with a minimum A– average in graduate courses and demonstrated research competence.

Program Requirements

Students are normally required to:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in the language of the major field of study during the first week of session. Undergraduate language courses may be required. These are not tabulated as part of graduate program course requirements. Successful completion of all coursework in these remedial undergraduate courses is part of a student's good progress in the PhD program.

  • Complete a major field of study and a minor field of study program.

  • Complete 9.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) including:

    • at least 3.0 FCEs in Slavic linguistics

    • 2.0 FCEs in theoretical linguistics from cognate disciplines (e.g., linguistics, anthropology)

    • 1.0 FCE in the literature of the major field of study language is strongly advised

    • at least one course (0.5 FCE) in Slavic languages from each of the three groups: West Slavic, East Slavic, and South Slavic by the end of Year 3 (minimum 1.5 FCEs total).

    • Students may be given a course exemption up to 3.0 FCEs for work completed in the MA.

  • Minor field of study programs should include 2.0 FCEs from any one of:

    • Croatian and Serbian Languages and Literatures

    • Czech and Slovak Languages and Literatures

    • Polish Language and Literature

    • Russian Language and Literature

    • Slavic Linguistics, and Ukrainian Language and Literature

    • a cognate discipline, with departmental approval (e.g., cinema studies, comparative literature, drama, history, philosophy).

  • Maintain a minimum annual average of A– to continue in the PhD program. Poor performance in one session (below a B average) may result in the termination of a student's PhD eligibility.

  • Demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German.

  • After successful completion of coursework and the French or German language requirement, students must pass written comprehensive examinations in the major field of study field and written and oral comprehensive examinations in the special field. The major field of study field exam cannot be taken if students have any outstanding coursework.

  • By the time of their major field of study field exam, students should have chosen their supervisor and the rest of their committee (in consultation with the supervisor).

  • Dissertation.

  • Residence. In Years 1 and 2, students must take courses and be on campus full-time to participate fully in the PhD program's activities.

Program Length

4 years (many students require 5 years to complete the program)

Time Limit

6 years
 

Field: Slavic Literatures

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures' additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate University of Toronto master's degree with a minimum A– average in graduate courses and demonstrated research competence.

Program Requirements

Students are normally required to:

  • Demonstrate proficiency in the language of the major field of study during the first week of session. Undergraduate language courses may be required. These are not tabulated as part of graduate program course requirements. Successful completion of all coursework in these remedial undergraduate courses is part of a student's good progress in the PhD program.

  • Complete SLA 1010H Slavic Proseminar prior to taking comprehensive examinations.

  • Complete a major field of study and a minor field of study program.

  • Complete 9.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) with at least 0.5 FCE in Slavic linguistics. Students may be given a course exemption up to 3.0 FCEs for work completed in the MA.

  • Minor field of study programs should include 2.0 FCEs from any one of:

    • Croatian and Serbian Languages and Literatures

    • Czech and Slovak Languages and Literatures

    • Polish Language and Literature

    • Russian Language and Literature

    • Slavic Linguistics, and Ukrainian Language and Literature

    • a cognate discipline, with departmental approval (e.g., cinema studies, comparative literature, drama, history, philosophy).

  • Maintain a minimum annual average of A– to continue in the PhD program. Poor performance in one session (below a B average) may result in the termination of a student's PhD eligibility.

  • Acquire a working knowledge of a Slavic language other than their major field of study language of study or complete at least two approved undergraduate courses in a Slavic language that is different than their major field of study language of study by the end of Year 3. A working knowledge is defined as proficiency equivalent to a second-year course. Students must also satisfy departmental requirements for their major field of study language. Students who do not major field of study in Russian most often choose it as their second Slavic language.

  • Demonstrate a reading knowledge of French or German.

  • After successful completion of coursework and the French or German language requirement, students must pass written comprehensive examinations in the major field of study field and written and oral comprehensive examinations in the special field. The major field of study field exam cannot be taken if students have any outstanding coursework.

  • By the time of their major field of study field exam, students should have chosen their supervisor and the rest of their committee (in consultation with the supervisor).

  • Dissertation.

  • Residence. In Years 1 and 2, students must take courses and be on campus full-time to participate fully in the PhD program's activities.

Program Length

4 years (many students require 5 years to complete the program)

Time Limit

6 years

Ian Garner

“My PhD is about the genesis and growth of the myth of Stalingrad in the Soviet Union and Russia.”

Ian Garner
PhD Candidate, Slavic Languages & Literatures
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