French Language and Literature

Program Overview

The Master of Arts program is both a self-contained program and the first stage towards doctoral studies. It has two objectives:

  • to allow the student to develop a thorough knowledge of the discipline through a program of coursework in French literary studies or linguistics; and
  • to develop an aptitude for research.

It is a 12-month program for full-time students. The program is also available on a part-time basis.

The Doctor of Philosophy program engages students in a program of study and research in French literature and/or linguistics approved by the department.

At the beginning of their course of study, students meet individually with either the Associate Chair or Graduate Coordinator in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, considered in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.


Quick Facts

Domestic International
Application payment deadline MA, PhD:

15-Jan-2020

MA, PhD:

15-Jan-2020

Supporting documents deadline MA, PhD:

31-Jan-2020

MA, PhD:

31-Jan-2020

Minimum admission average MA:

B+ in final year of bachelor’s

PhD:

A- average in Master’s

MA:

B+ in final year of bachelor’s

PhD:

A- average in Master’s

Direct entry option from bachelor's to PhD? PhD:

Yes (minimum A-minus average in bachelor’s degree)

PhD:

Yes (minimum A-minus average in bachelor’s degree)

Is a supervisor identified before or after admission? MA, PhD:

After

MA, PhD:

After

If a supervisor is identified after admission (as per question above), is admission conditional upon securing a supervisor? MA, PhD:

No

MA, PhD:

No

Is a supervisor assigned by the graduate unit or secured by the applicant? MA, PhD:

Applicant

MA, PhD:

Applicant

Program length (full-time only) MA:

3 sessions

PhD:

4 years; 5 years if entering directly from bachelor’s

MA:

3 sessions

PhD:

4 years; 5 years if entering directly from bachelor’s


Master of Arts​

Program Description

The Master of Arts program is both a self-contained program and the first stage towards doctoral studies. It has two objectives:

  • to allow the student to develop a thorough knowledge of the discipline through a program of coursework in French literary studies or linguistics and

  • to develop an aptitude for research.

It is a 12-month program for full-time students; the program is available on a part-time basis.

At the beginning of their course of study, students meet individually with the Associate Chair, Graduate in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, considered in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.

 

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • B+ average standing or better, with at least B+ in French. A B+ average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • Competence in French.

  • Concentration in French literature and/or linguistics, with a minimum of seven full courses, or equivalent, in French. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e., literature or linguistics). Applicants may request that up to 2.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) of the 5.0 FCEs in the discipline come from cognate disciplines upon the department’s approval.

  • Admission is based upon the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Prerequisite work, if necessary.

  • Students in both literature and linguistics are required to complete 4.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) as follows:

    • ​​​Students in literature complete 1.5 FCEs in literature (the three graduate courses FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, and FRE 1204H) and

      • ​​​2.5 FCEs from the regular graduate course offerings; or

      • 2.0 FCEs and the 0.5-FCE FRE 5001H Research Essay, a memoire of approximately 35 pages; or

      • 1.5 FCEs and the 1.0-FCE FRE 5000Y Research Essay, a 65- to 75-page memoire.

    • Students in linguistics complete 1.5 FCEs in linguistics (the three graduate courses FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, and FRE 1141H) and

      • ​​​2.5 FCEs from the regular graduate offerings; or

      • 2.0 FCEs and the 0.5-FCE FRE 5001H Research Essay, a memoire of approximately 35 pages; or

      • 1.5 FCEs and the 1.0-FCE FRE 5000Y Research Essay, a 65- to 75-page memoire.

  • Students must maintain a B average in order to be recommended for the degree and must obtain a minimum of mid-B in the Research Essay if taken. Students must also obtain a minimum of mid-B for the graduate seminars in literature (FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, and FRE 1204H) or the graduate seminars in linguistics (FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, and FRE 1141H).

  • Up to 1.0 FCE may be taken outside the department, with the permission of the Associate Chair, Graduate.

  • Normally, part-time students take the graduate seminars in literature or the graduate seminars in linguistics during the first year of their programs.

Program Length

3 sessions full-time (typical registration sequence: F/W/S);
6 sessions part-time

Time Limit

3 years full-time;
6 years part-time

​Doctor of Philosophy​

Program Description

The Doctor of Philosophy is necessary preparation for a career in higher education in Canada and abroad which will include teaching and research at an advanced academic level. The PhD includes a combination of advanced seminars, field examinations, a high amount of embedded professional experience in teaching and research, and the presentation of the results of a significant contribution to the discipline in the form of an original dissertation.

The PhD program engages students in a program of study and research in French literature and/or linguistics approved by the department. At the beginning of their course of study, students meet individually with the Associate Chair, Graduate in order to determine course selection with a view to ensuring that the student has a well-rounded program and, considered in conjunction with the undergraduate degree, has a broad knowledge of the discipline.

Admission to the PhD program is available via one of two routes: 1) an appropriate master’s degree or 2) direct entry with an appropriate bachelor’s degree with high academic standing.
 

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate master's degree in French literature or linguistics with high academic standing from a recognized university, with an average grade of at least an A– in the applicant's overall program.

  • An A– average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • A formal application and a sample of written work in French completed as part of the applicant's bachelor's or master's program in French literature or linguistics as appropriate. This written work should be a copy of the MA thesis if available.

  • Applicants holding a master's degree must submit a statement of purpose (maximum 500 words) in French that clearly outlines the area in which the applicant intends to pursue research in French literature or linguistics.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in French literature or linguistics at an advanced level.

  • Admission to all programs for post-graduate degrees is based on the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students admitted on the basis of an appropriate master's degree must complete 3.5 full-course equivalents (FCEs) with an average grade of at least an A– during Year 1 to remain in good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. With the department's permission, students may take 1.0 FCE outside the department.

    • Linguistics students must take FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, and FRE 1141H unless already completed, and FRE 1201H.

    • Literature students must take FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, and FRE 1204H, unless these courses or their equivalents have already been completed, and FRE 1201H.

  • Constitution of thesis committee. Students must submit a form indicating the members of their thesis committee and the provisional title of the thesis. This form must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student’s supervisory committee. Deadline to submit: June 15 of Year 1;

  • Thesis topic. Students must register a thesis topic with the department. The proposal must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student's supervisory committee. Deadline to register the topic: September 15 of Year 2;

  • Thesis proposal. A written thesis proposal, of 15 to 20 pages plus bibliography, must be submitted one week before the date of the oral field examination in April (see below).

  • Language requirements. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Old French or of another language (excluding French or English), as approved by the department by the end of Year 1;

  • Field examination (written and oral components).

    • Students admitted on the basis of a master's degree:

      • linguistics students must successfully prepare and submit a synthesis/analysis document and subsequently pass the oral part of the field examination in Year 2;

      • literature students must pass the field examination in Year 2.

    • Linguistics students will proceed to the oral field examination after they successfully complete the synthesis/analysis document (to be submitted by March 1 of Year 2), which is based on an annotated bibliography of 20 to 25 pages (double spaced) dealing with 50 publications concerning the most important theoretical, empirical, and methodological research in their fields (to be submitted by November 15 of Year 2).

    • Literature students will write an examination (by March 1 of Year 2), based on a written field examination document of 10 to 15 pages, plus bibliography (due by November 15 of Year 2), designed to test the student's knowledge of the general area of their research; the examination questions are given to students a week ahead of the examination. Student will proceed to the oral part of the examination after they successfully complete the written part.

    • In the case of a failure on the written examination (by literature students) or on the synthesis/analysis document (by linguistics students), the supervisory committee will meet with the student in order to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the written part of the examination be retaken in whole or in part within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the written part of the examination once only.

    • An oral examination (to be taken by April 30 of Year 2 by both literature and linguistics students) based on the thesis proposal, designed to test the student's readiness to proceed with thesis research. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the examination be retaken within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the oral part of the examination once only.

  • Meet with supervisory committee. Between the completion of the field examination's written and oral components (literature students) or the synthesis/analysis document and oral field examination (linguistics students) and the Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis, students will meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year and more frequently if required.

  • Thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis.

Program Length

4 years

Time Limit

6 years
 

PhD Program (Direct-Entry)

Minimum Admission Requirements

  • Applicants are admitted under the General Regulations of the School of Graduate Studies. Applicants must also satisfy the Department of French Language and Literature's additional admission requirements stated below.

  • An appropriate bachelor's degree with high academic standing from a recognized university that includes at least 7.0 full-course equivalents (FCEs) in French language and literature/linguistics, with an average grade of at least an A– in the overall program. A minimum of five of the seven full courses, or equivalent, should be in the proposed area of study (i.e., literature or linguistics). Applicants may request that up to 2.0 FCEs of the 5.0 FCEs in the discipline come from cognate disciplines upon the department’s approval. Admission is limited to exceptionally qualified applicants.

  • An A– average does not automatically lead to admission.

  • A formal application and a sample of written work in French completed as part of the applicant's bachelor's program in French literature or linguistics as appropriate.

  • Applicants must satisfy the department that they are capable of independent research in French literature or linguistics at an advanced level.

  • Admission to all programs for post-graduate degrees is based on the evidence of the supporting letters and the applicant's academic record.

Program Requirements

  • Coursework. Students admitted on the basis of an appropriate bachelor's degree (direct entry) must maintain an average grade of at least an A– in Year 1 and Year 2 to remain in good academic standing and to continue in the PhD program. With the department's permission, students may take up to 1.0 FCE outside the department in each of Year 1 and Year 2.

    • In Year 1, complete 4.0 FCEs with an average grade of at least an A–.

    • In Year 2, complete 3.5 FCEs with an average grade of at least an A–.

    • Linguistics students must take FRE 1103H, FRE 1104H, FRE 1141H, and FRE 1201H.

    • Literature students must take FRE 1202H, FRE 1203H, FRE 1204H, and FRE 1201H.

  • Constitution of thesis committee. Students must submit a form indicating the members of their thesis committee and the provisional title of the thesis. This form must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student’s supervisory committee. Deadline to submit: June 15 of Year 2.

  • Thesis topic. Students must register a thesis topic with the department. The proposal must be signed by the faculty member who has agreed to direct the thesis and by the two faculty members who will serve on the student's supervisory committee. Deadline to register the topic: September 15 of Year 3.

  • Thesis proposal. A written thesis proposal, of 15 to 20 pages plus bibliography, must be submitted one week before the date of the oral field examination in April (see below).

  • Language requirements. Students must demonstrate a reading knowledge of Old French or of another language (excluding French or English), as approved by the department—by the end of Year 2.

  • Field examination (written and oral components).

    • Students admitted by direct entry:

      • linguistics students must successfully prepare and submit a synthesis/analysis document and subsequently pass the oral part of the field examination in Year 3;

      • literature students must pass the field examination in Year 3.

    • Linguistics students will proceed to the oral field examination after they successfully complete the synthesis/analysis document (to be submitted by March 1 of Year 2), which is based on an annotated bibliography of 20 to 25 pages (double spaced) dealing with 50 publications concerning the most important theoretical, empirical, and methodological research in their fields (to be submitted by November 15 of Year 2).

    • Literature students will write an examination (by March 1 of Year 2), based on a written field examination document of 10 to 15 pages, plus bibliography (due by November 15 of Year 2), designed to test the student's knowledge of the general area of their research; the examination questions are given to students a week ahead of the examination. Student will proceed to the oral part of the examination after they successfully complete the written part.

    • In the case of a failure on the written examination (by literature students) or on the synthesis/analysis document (by linguistics students), the supervisory committee will meet with the student in order to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the written part of the examination be retaken in whole or in part within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the written part of the examination once only.

    • An oral examination (to be taken by April 30 of Year 2 by both literature and linguistics students) based on the thesis proposal, designed to test the student's readiness to proceed with thesis research. In the case of a failure, the supervisory committee will meet with the student to discuss the weaknesses that caused the failure and to make specific recommendations concerning the student's program. The committee may recommend that the examination be retaken within a specific period of time; it may also recommend termination of the student's program. If the recommendation is to retake the exam, the student may retake the oral part of the examination once only.

  • Meet with supervisory committee. Between the completion of the field examination's written and oral components (literature students) or the synthesis/analysis document and oral field examination (linguistics students) and the Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis, students will meet with the supervisory committee at least once a year and more frequently if required.

  • Thesis and Doctoral Final Oral Examination on the thesis.

Program Length

5 years

Time Limit

7 years

Julie St-Laurent

“My first year had confirmed I had chosen the right program.”

Julie St-Laurent
Alumna, PhD (2018), French Language & Literature
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